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1967 Chevrolet Camaro Coupe The first-generation Chevrolet Camaro is an American pony car which appeared in Chevrolet dealerships on September 29,1966 for the 1967 model year on a brand-new rear wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a 2-door, 2 plus 2 seater. The RS was an appearance package that included hidden headlights, revised taillights with back-up lights under the rear bum...
1976 Lincoln Continental Your first impression when you approach this 1976 Lincoln Continental is that it's simply mammoth. On a 120-inch wheelbase, it rivals the biggest cars of the '50s, and today anything with 120 inches between the wheels is a full-sized dually pickup. In fact, this car is more than 11 inches longer than a new Lincoln Navigator! But it isn't merely big for the sake of being...
1974 Ford Econoline Van No single vehicle better represents the good times and easy-living lifestyle of the 1970s better than does a custom van. The personalized van covered all the bases. It was part muscle car, part apartment on wheels, and, of course, part art canvas, serving as a very groovy way to express oneself. It gave dudes and dudettes with long, feathered hair, bell bottoms, and an a...
1996 Chevrolet Impala SS In retrospect, it wasn't a good idea. It was brilliant. A stroke of genius. Looking back it's amazing the 1990's Impala SS ever happened. In the early 1990s, family-sized rear-wheel drive muscle was dead at GM. The Monte Carlo SS and Buick Grand National were long gone and families didn't fit in a Camaro or Corvette. Then in 1992, Jim Perkins, a car-guy and the man in c...
1979 Chevrolet G10 Van Once upon a time - or more accurately, back in the 1970s - the van reigned supreme. Riding-in right on the heels of the fading muscle car era, the custom van became the ultimate self-expression vehicle- tricked-out and personalized to show all the world just how your bad self rolled. They were badass, man- a portable pampered pad that allowed you to take all your extra-cu...
1941 Ford Business Coupe In mid-September 1940, Henry Ford - in his last appearance at a new car introduction - received 500 reporters to see the new 1941 Ford models. True to form, he said little, but the car said a lot about the company's willingness to go with the flow. The 1941s were the first of the "fat" Fords, with a clean contemporary look that was right in tune with the era. Further, F...
1930 Rolls Royce Phantom II Dual Cowl Phaeton Rolls Royce has a long history of accommodating the well-heeled buyer by providing the chassis and drivetrain to a customer, and that customer goes to a custom coach builder and orders exactly the car they want. We have a few examples of this at the Classic Auto Mall. A hand-built car built to the precise specifications and individual requirements. ...
1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible The 1955-57 two-seat Ford Thunderbird is among the most recognized iconic American cars. It's been put in television shows, movies and print advertisements, not to mention being pictured on a U.S. postage stamp. The mass media often has mistakenly called any sporty looking car, such as the Ford Mustang, a "sports car." It's given the 1955-57 Thunderbird the sam...
1976 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe By 1976, the United States economy was on the mend from the 1973-1975 global economic recession. The recession, which had been caused in part by the 1973 oil crisis, had caused gas prices to soar which, in turn, had made automotive manufacturers begin re-evaluating the types of vehicles they were manufacturing. Over 540,000 third generation Corvettes were built bet...
1948 Chevrolet Fleetmaster After nearly four war years in which no civilian passenger cars had been produced, Detroit could have sold anything with wheels that went round and round. Chevrolet, along with most of its competitors, shrewdly elected to serve up existing models. After all, the paid-for factory tooling was already in place, and the demand for new cars was unprecedented. For consignme...
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