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1959 Cadillac Coupe DeVille The name ""DeVille"" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning ""of the town"". In French coach building parlance, a coup de ville, from the French couper, (to cut), i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in the town ...
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille Here's to the past they can kiss my glass I hope she's happy with him Here's to the girl who wrecked my world That angel who did me in I think the devil drives a Coupe de Ville I watched them drive away over the hill Not against her will, I've got time to kill Down in Brokenheartsville...Joe Nichols Hold on tight ladies and gents, there's one cool cad in house right ...
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville 1972 was a very BIG year for Cadillac, as well as for US workers. And in a number of ways, things haven't been quite the same for any of us since. When this 1972 Coupe DeVille first rolled off the assembly line, it was the biggest ever, a full nineteen feet long and almost seven feet wide. And this generation remains the high-water mark for American cars, in size. Th...
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1959 Cadillac Coupe DeVille The name "DeVille" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning "of the town". In French coach building parlance, a coupe de ville, from the French couper, (to cut), i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in the town or ...
1955 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Superlative reputation in any field of endeavor is historically slow in the making. At the summit of the automaker's craft was the undisputed "Standard of the World". Cadillac made the competition appear as a mere "pied- -terre" in the luxury car arena. Exquisite craftsmanship, attention to detail, elegance second to none...with a poised dignity which was the...
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille Here's to the past they can kiss my glass I hope she's happy with him Here's to the girl who wrecked my world That angel who did me in I think the devil drives a Coupe de Ville I watched them drive away over the hill Not against her will, I've got time to kill Down in Brokenheartsville...Joe Nichols Hold on tight ladies and gents, there's one cool cad in house right ...
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville 1972 was a very BIG year for Cadillac, as well as for US workers. And in a number of ways, things haven't been quite the same for any of us since. When this 1972 Coupe DeVille first rolled off the assembly line, it was the biggest ever, a full nineteen feet long and almost seven feet wide. And this generation remains the high-water mark for American cars, in size. Th...
1997 Cadillac Sedan Deville The name "DeVille" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning "of the town". In French coach building parlance, a coupe de ville, from the French couper (to cut) i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in the town or ci...
1979 Cadillac Coupe Deville D'Elegance The name "DeVille" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning "of the town". In French coach building parlance, a coupe de ville, from the French couper (to cut) i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in the...
1979 Cadillac Coupe Deville D'Elegance The name ""DeVille"" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning ""of the town"". In French coach building parlance, a coup de ville, from the French couper (to cut) i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in ...
1997 Cadillac Sedan Deville The name ""DeVille"" is derived from the French de la ville or de ville meaning ""of the town"". In French coach building parlance, a coup de ville, from the French couper (to cut) i.e. shorten or reduce, was a short four-wheeled closed carriage with an inside seat for two and an outside seat for the driver and this smaller vehicle was intended for use in the town or...
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